Today’s designers use optical splitters to passively tap, split, and multiplex optical signals. Since their introduction in the 1970s, splitters have seen their share of technological development, including the use of bulk optics, lenses, and optical fibers. As fiber optic communication systems expanded from conventional point-to-point networks into more complex…
Attenuation is major concern in every fiber optic system. The further a digital signal travels, the more its strength diminishes. Every splice, every connector, and even the fiber itself will contribute a tiny bit more to the overall system loss. Fortunately, for spans that are too long or have losses…
Fiber optic communication systems consist of more than just a physical fiber optic link. These links begin and end at electro-optic systems that transmit and receive the signals, and may connect through segments of coax and twisted pair cables, microwave, satellite, or radio.
A few months ago, we published some information about the pros and cons of sealed versus weather-tight fiber optic splice closures (FOSCs). We recently came across some additional information on labor time when having to splice into each type in an aerial installation. Let us know if you agree!
A high-performance fiber optic network requires low attenuation and low reflectance values to obtain the necessary bit error rate level. Unfortunately, all it takes is one contaminated or damaged connector to slow down or disrupt a transmission system.
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